Posts

Say It with Your Chest: 4 Really Important Things Kimberly Drew Once Said.

Kimberly Drew a.k.a. @MuseumMammy is a New York-based thought leader whose practice is at the intersection of contemporary art, race and technology. She works both within traditional institutions and beyond them to help take them to new places.

The most critical voices of the millennial generation are concurrently engaged in developing their political, pedagogical and aesthetic framework. According to Boston-based collective Intelligent Mischief a third-culture perspective, the critical space between the so-called American identity and one’s native country, is “[a] complex place … the people who inhabit them are quite often best positioned to think about complex issues in creative ways. The margins are really the intersections or borders.” Drew’s own practice can be described as such. She creates a place for those who would otherwise be negated access and space. It’s not oppositional, it’s simply an inverted version of what already exists.

While growing visibility and relevance for the MET through social media, she’s gained a massive following in her own right, (113K on Instagram alone) through a careful mastery of the area between the formal and informal. However, that doesn’t mean she isn’t going to keep it real. Below are our favorite four observations by Ms. Kimberly Drew.

 

Blackness is a technology in and of itself. The way we survive and thrive has always been contingent on building technologies against the system that sets us up to fail.

The Lenny Letter

Spending less time being worried about being “late” and focusing on being worth the wait.

Twitter

I think about the things I’m sending out in the world because there are so many silences within the web and in the truth of our particular moment. I try to think about the things that I send out, can create, or can share, and how I could share positive images and also real images and also be able to articulate history in a way that feels inclusive…When you’re adding to this noise, in what ways are you improving upon silence?

The Creative Independent

I’m not really a critic, I’m more of an active observer.

Liking & Critiquing presented by the New Museum